Tag Archives: #Cdiff

Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection

Often, the focus of medical education is on clinical diagnosis and management of disease. But what about prevention? Prevention is key. Here are some ways for both the patient and healthcare provider to prevent further infections:

Prevent C.diff infographic

 

  1. Reduce transmission as much as possible
    1. Wash hands with soap and water after leaving the room of a patient with active C. difficile infection (CDI) OR use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if a sink is not available
    2. Advocate healthcare facilities to:
      • place sinks nearby patient rooms
      • consider sink placement in the future construction of healthcare facilities
    3. Educate your patients and those who live with them to:
      • wash their hands well after using the toilet
      • have infected individuals use separate toilets and toilet accessories during treatment, if possible
  1. Avoid unnecessary antibiotic use
    • Avoid prescribing an antibiotic if low likelihood of bacterial infection
    • Narrow broad-spectrum antibiotics as soon as possible
    • Discontinue antibiotics as soon as possible
  2. Consider prophylactic PO vancomycin for patients with history of recurrent C. difficile infection
    • A retrospective review demonstrated that administration of PO vancomycin 125mg twice a day was associated with a lower incidence of recurrent C. difficile infection (4.2% vs. 26.6%, p<0.001)3 
  1. Educate yourself on the risks and benefits of probiotic use and be able to relay that information to your patients if they ask.
    • Some studies show no reduction in incidence of C. difficile infection with probiotic use6,7
    • Other studies (including a Cochrane review) show significant reduction in C. difficile infection incidence with probiotic use8,9,10,11
    • Studies have demonstrated that probiotics are more likely to reduce C. difficile infection incidence:
      • in patients with a baseline risk of C. difficile infection > 5%8,9
      • when probiotics are administered at higher doses10
      • when the probiotic consists of multiple strains10
      • when probiotics were administered within 2 days of antibiotic initiation11
    • This is the IDSA Clinical Practice Guidelines for C. difficile infection statement on probiotics:
      “There are insufficient data at this time to recommend administration of probiotics for primary prevention of CDI outside of clinical trials (no recommendation).”
      The guidelines cite the bias towards probiotics in many trials that enrolled mostly patients at very high risk of C.difficile infection and the potential for probiotics to cause harm by introducing new infections to hospitalized patients.

 Any prevention strategies I didn’t mention? What do you think is the most effective prevention strategy? I would love to hear your thoughts!

 

References

  1. McDonald LC, Gerding DN, Johnson S, et al. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Clostridium difficile Infection in Adults and Children: 2017 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). Clin Infect Dis. 2018; 66(7):1-48.
  2. Jorgensen JH, Pfaller MA, Carroll KC, et al. Manual of Clinical Microbiology, Eleventh Edition.
  3. Van Hise NW, Bryant AM, Hennessey EK, et al. Efficacy of Oral Vancomycin in Preventing Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients Treated With Systemic Antimicrobial Agents. Clin Infect Dis. 2016; 63(5):651-653.
  4. Kelly CP, Lamont JT, and Bakken JS. Clostridium difficile infection in adults: Treatment and prevention. In Baron EL, ed. UpToDate. Waltham, Mass.: UpToDate, 2018. [https://www.uptodate.com/contents/clostridium-difficile-infection-in-adults-treatment-and-prevention]. Accessed May 25, 2018.
  5. Davidson LE and Hibberd PL. Clostridioides difficile and probiotics. In Baron EL, ed. UpToDate. Waltham, Mass.: UpToDate, 2018. [https://www.uptodate.com/contents/clostridioides-formerly-clostridium-difficile-and-probiotics]. Accessed Nov 13, 2018.
  6. Allen SJ, Wareham K, Wang D, Bradley C, Hutchings H, Harris W, et al. Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and Clostridium difficile diarrhoea in older inpatients (PLACIDE): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial. Lancet. 2013; 382(9900): 1249-57.
  7. Ehrhardt S, Guo N, Hinz R, Schoppen S, May J, Reiser M, et al. Saccharomyces boulardii to Prevent Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea: A Randomized, Double-Masked, Placebo-Controlled Trial. Open Forum Infect Dis. 2016; 3(1):ofw011.
  8. Goldenberg JZ, Yap C, Lytvyn L, Lo CK, Beardsley J, Mertz D, et al. Probiotics for the prevention of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in adults and children. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2017; 12:CD006095.
  9. Johnston BC, Lytvyn L, Lo CK, Allen SJ, Wang D, Szajewska H, et al. Microbial Preparations (Probiotics) for the Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection in Adults and Children: An Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis of 6,851 Participants. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2018; 39(7): 771-781.
  10. Johnston BC, Ma SSY, Goldenberg JZ, Thorlung K, Vandvik PO, Loeb M, et al. Probiotics for the Prevention of Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea. Ann of Intern Med. 2012; 157:878-888
  11. Shen NT, Maw A, Tmanova LL, Pino A, Ancy K, Crawford CV, et al. Timely Use of Probiotics in Hospitalized Adults Prevents Clostridium difficle Infection: A Systematic Review With Meta-Regression Analysis. Gastroenterology. 2017; 152(8): 1889-1900.

 

 

 

 

Clostridium difficile

In light of the recently published IDSA guidelines on C. difficile, I thought I would write up a summary of the guidelines as well as provide some of the background microbiology of the organism for review.

Structure

  • obligate anaerobes
  • gram-positive bacilli
    – form spores (= dormant, non-reproductive structure that the bacteria can reduce itself to in order to survive for extended periods of time in extreme conditions)
  • produce toxins (toxin A and toxin B) that cause disease

 

clostridium-difficile gram stain

Environment

  • animal and human feces
  • soil
  • sewage

 

Mechanism of pathogenicity

*Not all strains of C. difficile are pathogenic – only the ones who produce toxins can cause C. difficile disease

Pathogenesis:

Transmission occurs with ingestion of spores via the fecal-oral route ⇒ spores activate in the colon to replicating bacteria ⇒ bacteria release toxins ⇒ toxins cause breakdown of the colon cells’ cytoskeleton framework ⇒ apoptosis ⇒ breakdown of the mucosal wall ⇒ DIARRHEA!

 

Risk factors for acquiring C. difficile:

  1. ANTIBIOTIC EXPOSURE
  2. Exposure to healthcare facilities
  3. Age and immunosuppression
  4. ?Gastric acid suppression (use of proton pump inhibitors or H2 receptor blockers)
    — the evidence-based-medicine jury is still out on this one

 

Clinical features

  • symptoms can develop during antibiotic treatment or up to 6 weeks after the course of antibiotics has been finished
  • patients can also become infected even without exposure to antibiotics (both in the healthcare setting but also in the community setting)
  • carrier state = a patient who is colonized with C. difficile but is currently asymptomatic

1.Symptoms and physical exam signs:

  • Non-bloody, WATERY DIARRHEA (≥ 3 loose stools in 24 hours)
    *occasionally patients can develop ileus with severe infection which will not result in diarrhea but rather lack of bowel movements
  • Abdominal pain/cramping
  • Fever and chills
  • Abdominal distention/tenderness
  • Nausea/anorexia

2.Laboratory findings:

  • High white blood count (occasionally precedes the diarrhea by 1-2 days)
  • Elevated creatinine
  • Elevated lactate and low albumin (in fulminant cases)

 

Pseudomembranous colitis = inflammation of the colon causing elevated white and yellow-colored plaques to form and coalesce together to create a pseudomembrane on the colon wall that can be seen by colonoscopy.

 

Diagnostics

  1. When to test: when patient has new onset, ≥ 3 unformed stools that cannot be explained by another cause (i.e. laxative use)
  2. Options for testing:

* C. difficile can be grown in culture, but anaerobes take a while to grow and it would not provide an answer as to whether the strain is toxigenic (i.e. produces toxin) or not, so it is not commonly used for clinical diagnostic purposes.

What it is Advantages Disadvantages
Toxin EIA assay Antibody assay that detect toxins High specificity (>84%) Low sensitivity (31-99%)
GDH assay Detects GDH (an enzyme produced by C. difficile) High NPV (>99%)

Quick turn-around

Cannot distinguish toxigenic vs. non-toxigenic C. difficile strains
NAAT/PCR PCR method that detects toxin production gene High NPV (>99%)

Quick turn-around

Poor specificity and PPV

*Changes depending on whom specimens are collected on (low suspicion vs. high suspicion)

EIA, enzyme immunoassay; GDH, glutamate dehydrogenase; NPV, negative predictive value; PPV, positive predictive value; NAAT, nucleic acid amplification test; PCR, polymerase chain reaction.

Many healthcare facilities are currently doing only PCR testing. It’s highly sensitive and the results return quickly (usually within 24 hours).

The problem: this practice is yielding a lot of false positives (patients who are carriers but do not truly have an active infection) which ⇒ over-treatment ⇒ patient discomfort, potential side effects, infection control consequences for the hospital, and extra costs.

Why: This is thought to be due to the fact that a lot of tests are sent inappropriately (on patients that have diarrhea but no other evidence of infection such as leukocytosis, AKI, abdominal pain, fever, etc.)

Solution (as proposed by IDSA guidelines):

  1. A multiple step algorithm:
  • GDH assay + EIA assay
  • GDH assay + EIA assay with NAAT as a tiebreaker
  • NAAT + EIA assay

                  OR

  1. We can agree to be more mindful of when we send the test (when the pre-test probability is high) and continue to use the NAAT/PCR method alone.

Bottom line: Many hospitals are switching over to the two-step testing method for multiple reasons:

  • behavior change is difficult to implement and sustain
  • provides more accurate incidence of nosocomial-acquired infections in the hospital

WHEN YOU THINK OF SENDING A C. DIFFICILE TEST, ask yourself:

  1. Does this patient have an unexplained fever, leukocytosis, or new abdominal pain/distention, in addition to the diarrhea (or in presence of ileus)?
    if yes ⇒ send the test
  1. If not, is there another explanation for the diarrhea?
    (i.e. laxatives, new medications (especially antibiotics), part of already known illness, etc.)
    if yes ⇒ consider removing the potential cause (if possible) and re-evaluate or monitor for worsening symptoms
    if not ⇒ send the test

 

Treatment

The IDSA has a really great table to reference when choosing treatment options for your C. difficile infected patient.

***PO Metronidazole is no longer the 1st-line agent for C. diff infection treatment***

C.diff treatment chart

                                                                                                            McDonald et al. CID 2018

 

Recurrence

Recurrence of C. difficile infection = reappearance of symptoms within 2-8 weeks after completion of therapy

  • up to 25% of patients will experience a recurrence
  • once patient had one recurrence, they are at higher risk for future recurrences

 

TAKE-HOME POINTS:

  • The MAJOR risk factor for C. difficile infection is ANTIBIOTIC EXPOSURE
    ⇒ DO NOT give antibiotics to those who do not truly need them
  • Symptoms/signs include watery diarrhea, abdominal cramping/pain, and elevated WBC and creatinine
  • C. difficile infection CAN cause ileus (i.e. no diarrhea)
  • Only send test when you have a high pre-test probability to avoid false positives
  • Metronidazole is NO LONGER recommended for treatment of C. difficile

 

Got questions? Disagree? Leave your comments below!

 

References

  1. McDonald LC, Gerding DN, Johnson S, et al. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Clostridium difficile Infection in Adults and Children: 2017 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). Clin Infect Dis. 2018. 66(7):1-48. [PMID: 29562266]
  2. Jorgensen JH, Pfaller MA, Carroll KC, et al. Manual of Clinical Microbiology, Eleventh Edition.
  3. Lamont JT. (2018). Clostridium difficile infection in adults: Epidemiology, microbiology, and pathophysiology. In Baron EL, ed. UpToDate. Waltham, Mass.: UpToDate, 2018. [https://www.uptodate.com/contents/clostridium-difficile-infection-in-adults-epidemiology-microbiology-and-pathophysiology]. Accessed May 25, 2018.
  4. Lamont JT, Kelly CP, and Bakken JS. Clostridium difficile infection in adults: Clinical manifestations and diagnosis. In Baron EL, ed. UpToDate. Waltham, Mass.: UpToDate, 2018. [https://www.uptodate.com/contents/clostridium-difficile-infection-in-adults-clinical-manifestations-and-diagnosis]. Accessed May 25, 2018.
  5. Kelly CP, Lamont JT, and Bakken JS. Clostridium difficile infection in adults: Treatment and prevention. In Baron EL, ed. UpToDate. Waltham, Mass.: UpToDate, 2018. [https://www.uptodate.com/contents/clostridium-difficile-infection-in-adults-treatment-and-prevention]. Accessed May 25, 2018.