Tag Archives: #micro

5 things that ID fellows wish you knew

3rdtimeisthe charm

1. Yeast in the sputum does not always need treatment.

We often see yeast pop up in sputum cultures and BAL cultures in ICU patients. However, yeast in hospitalized patients is typically Candida species, which are NOT typical pulmonary pathogens. Candida pneumonia is rare. In a recent study that looked at how often yeast isolated from sputum/BAL culture in ICU patients truly are reflective of Candida pneumonia, they found that 5/701 samples were consistent with Candida pneumonia (0.7%).  3/5 patients had severe gastric contents aspiration and 4/5 were immunocompromised.1

What does this mean? Unless the patient recently had significant aspiration or is immunocompromised, Candida spp. in the sputum is unlikely to be a true pathogen.

Other potential yeasts can include Cryptococcus spp., Histoplasma capsulatum, Blastomycosis spp., Coccidioides spp., and Paracoccidioides spp. These can represent true clinical infections. Treatment for these infections is different from Candida spp. and risk should be assessed given the patient’s clinical context.

 

2. It’s all about “source control”.

This means that if the area of infection can be physically removed or debrided, it should be done to optimize the chance of cure. This can also help increase diagnostic yield for targeted antibiotic therapy. Examples:

  • If there is an abscess, it should be drained, if possible.
  • If there is an infected foreign body, it should be removed, if possible.
  • If there is infected bone, it should be debrided/removed, if possible.

The STOP-IT trial in 2015 showed that in patients with intra-abdominal abscesses who received adequate source control (drainage of abscess or surgical resection), 3-5 days of antibiotics post-source control was non-inferior to 8-10 days of antibiotics after source control.2

There are obviously times when source control is not possible, too risky, or may cause more harm than benefit. However, anytime a patient has an infection, source control should be considered in the initial management strategy.

 

3. Do not treat asymptomatic bacteriuria and do not send urine cultures on asymptomatic patients.

  • The urogenital tract is not a sterile area and bacteria are often found that are not causing any symptoms or harm to the patient.
  • Antibiotics that are started for asymptomatic bacteriuria can cause harm.
  • If a patient has a urinary catheter, replace urinary catheter and resend a urine culture.
  • Pyuria in asymptomatic bacteriuria does not require treatment3.

 

The 2 times to treat asymptomatic bacteriuria:

  1. Pregnant patients
  2. Patients who are about to undergo a urologic procedure

 

A Cochrane review published in 2015 evaluated 9 randomized-controlled-trials (and a total of 1614 non-pregnant adults) who looked at antibiotic treatment vs. placebo for asymptomatic bacteriuria, and demonstrated that there was no difference in development of symptomatic urinary tract infections, UTI complications, or death between the two groups. The treatment group had a 3.77 increased risk of antibiotic side effects.4

 

4. Beta-D-glucan results need to be taken in the context of the patient’s clinical picture.

Not all fungal infections cause elevated beta-D-glucan and not all elevated beta-D-glucan levels indicate a fungal infection.

Initial studies that looked at beta-D-glucan test characteristics were done in immunocompromised patients. In that group, the test performed well, with sensitivity ranging 64-95% and specificity ranging from 92-95% (variation depending on prevalence and test level cutoff for positivity).5-7

However, in the non-immunocompromised population in the intensive care units, the test has not shown to have the same specificity. The sensitivity remains high in the 80%-90% range while specificity drops as low as 38% in non-neutropenic patients with known candida colonization.8-10

5. Send a GeneXpert© NAAT test with the first AFB smear and remember that there is no such thing as a “TB rule out”.

The current CDC/IDSA guidelines in evaluation of active pulmonary tuberculosis is to:

  • obtain 3 sputum AFB smears/cultures at least 8-24 hours apart.11
  • ideally obtain at least one smear as an early morning sample (highest concentration of mycobacteria at that time).11
  • send a GeneXpert© nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) on the 1st sputum specimen.11
    ⇒ This test can detect tuberculosis genes as well as detect rifampin susceptibility and usually comes back quickly.
  • A bronchial (BAL) specimen can count as one sputum sample.11
  • In the US from 2011-2013, only 46% of patients with TB had a positive AFB smear.
    ⇒ Three negative sputum AFB smears does not “rule out” TB. The patient can still have TB, but the probability of TB is lower and they are less likely to be infectious if all three smears are negative.11,12,13

 

 

References:

  1. Schnabel RM, Linssen, CF, Guion CF, van Mook WN, and Bergmans DC. Candida pneumonia in Intensive Care Unit? OFID. 2014;1(1) ofu026. doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofu026
  2. Sawyer RG, Claridge JA, Nathens AB, et al. Trial of Short-Course Antimicrobial Therapy for Intraabdominal Infection. NEJM. 2015; 372:1996-2005. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1411162
  3. Nicolle LE, Bradley S, Colgan R, et al. Infectious Diseases Society of America Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Adults. CID. 2005; 40: 643-654.
  4. Trestioreanu, AZ, Lador A, Sauerbrun-Cutler M, and Leibovici, L. Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2015. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD009534.pub2
  5. Odabasi Z, Mattiuzzi G, Estey E, et al. β- d -Glucan as a Diagnostic Adjunct for Invasive Fungal Infections: Validation, Cutoff Development, and Performance in Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome. Clin Infect Dis. 2004; 2(15):199-205. doi:https://doi.org/10.1086/421944
  6. Ostrosky-Zeichner L, Alexander BD, Kett DH, et al. Multicenter Clinical Evaluation of the (1→3) β-D-Glucan Assay as an Aid to Diagnosis of Fungal Infections in Humans. Clin Infect Dis. 2005; 41(5): 654-659. doi:https://doi.org/10.1086/432470
  7. Obayashi T, Negishi K, Suzuki T, and Funata N. Reappraisal of the serum (1–>3)-beta-D-glucan assay for the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections–a study based on autopsy cases from 6 years. Clin Infect Dis. 2008;46(12):1864-70. doi:10.1086/588295
  8. Mohr JF, Sims C, Paetznick V, et al. Prospective survey of (1à3)-beta-D-glucan and its relationshop to invasive candidiasis in the surgical intensive care unit setting. J Clin Microbio. 2011; 49(10):58-61. doi:10.1128/JCM.01240-10
  9. Liew YX, Teo J, Ai-Ling Too I, et al. Candida Surveillance in Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU) in a Tertiary Institution. BMC Infect Dis. 2015; 15(256):1-8. doi:10.1186/s12879-015-0997-6
  10. Lo Cascio G, Koncan R, Stringari G, et al. Interference of confounding factors on the use of (1,3)-beta-D-glucan in the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis in the intensive care unit. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2015; 34(2):357-365. doi:10.1007/s10096-014-2239-z
  11. Lewinsohn DM, Leonard MK, LoBue PA, Cohn DL, Daley CL et al. Official American Thoracic Society/Infectious Disease Society of America/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Practice Guidelines: Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Adults and Children. 2017; 64(2):111-115. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciw778
  12. Mase S, Ramsay A, Ng N, Henry M, Hopewell PC, Cunningham J, Urbanczik R, Perkins M, Aziz MA, Pai M. Yield of serial sputum specimen examinations in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis: a systematic review. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2007;11(5):485-95. PMID:17439669
  13. CDC. Reported Tuberculosis in the United States, 2013. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, October 2014.

Clostridium difficile

In light of the recently published IDSA guidelines on C. difficile, I thought I would write up a summary of the guidelines as well as provide some of the background microbiology of the organism for review.

Structure

  • obligate anaerobes
  • gram-positive bacilli
    – form spores (= dormant, non-reproductive structure that the bacteria can reduce itself to in order to survive for extended periods of time in extreme conditions)
  • produce toxins (toxin A and toxin B) that cause disease

 

clostridium-difficile gram stain

Environment

  • animal and human feces
  • soil
  • sewage

 

Mechanism of pathogenicity

*Not all strains of C. difficile are pathogenic – only the ones who produce toxins can cause C. difficile disease

Pathogenesis:

Transmission occurs with ingestion of spores via the fecal-oral route ⇒ spores activate in the colon to replicating bacteria ⇒ bacteria release toxins ⇒ toxins cause breakdown of the colon cells’ cytoskeleton framework ⇒ apoptosis ⇒ breakdown of the mucosal wall ⇒ DIARRHEA!

 

Risk factors for acquiring C. difficile:

  1. ANTIBIOTIC EXPOSURE
  2. Exposure to healthcare facilities
  3. Age and immunosuppression
  4. ?Gastric acid suppression (use of proton pump inhibitors or H2 receptor blockers)
    — the evidence-based-medicine jury is still out on this one

 

Clinical features

  • symptoms can develop during antibiotic treatment or up to 6 weeks after the course of antibiotics has been finished
  • patients can also become infected even without exposure to antibiotics (both in the healthcare setting but also in the community setting)
  • carrier state = a patient who is colonized with C. difficile but is currently asymptomatic

1.Symptoms and physical exam signs:

  • Non-bloody, WATERY DIARRHEA (≥ 3 loose stools in 24 hours)
    *occasionally patients can develop ileus with severe infection which will not result in diarrhea but rather lack of bowel movements
  • Abdominal pain/cramping
  • Fever and chills
  • Abdominal distention/tenderness
  • Nausea/anorexia

2.Laboratory findings:

  • High white blood count (occasionally precedes the diarrhea by 1-2 days)
  • Elevated creatinine
  • Elevated lactate and low albumin (in fulminant cases)

 

Pseudomembranous colitis = inflammation of the colon causing elevated white and yellow-colored plaques to form and coalesce together to create a pseudomembrane on the colon wall that can be seen by colonoscopy.

 

Diagnostics

  1. When to test: when patient has new onset, ≥ 3 unformed stools that cannot be explained by another cause (i.e. laxative use)
  2. Options for testing:

* C. difficile can be grown in culture, but anaerobes take a while to grow and it would not provide an answer as to whether the strain is toxigenic (i.e. produces toxin) or not, so it is not commonly used for clinical diagnostic purposes.

What it is Advantages Disadvantages
Toxin EIA assay Antibody assay that detect toxins High specificity (>84%) Low sensitivity (31-99%)
GDH assay Detects GDH (an enzyme produced by C. difficile) High NPV (>99%)

Quick turn-around

Cannot distinguish toxigenic vs. non-toxigenic C. difficile strains
NAAT/PCR PCR method that detects toxin production gene High NPV (>99%)

Quick turn-around

Poor specificity and PPV

*Changes depending on whom specimens are collected on (low suspicion vs. high suspicion)

EIA, enzyme immunoassay; GDH, glutamate dehydrogenase; NPV, negative predictive value; PPV, positive predictive value; NAAT, nucleic acid amplification test; PCR, polymerase chain reaction.

Many healthcare facilities are currently doing only PCR testing. It’s highly sensitive and the results return quickly (usually within 24 hours).

The problem: this practice is yielding a lot of false positives (patients who are carriers but do not truly have an active infection) which ⇒ over-treatment ⇒ patient discomfort, potential side effects, infection control consequences for the hospital, and extra costs.

Why: This is thought to be due to the fact that a lot of tests are sent inappropriately (on patients that have diarrhea but no other evidence of infection such as leukocytosis, AKI, abdominal pain, fever, etc.)

Solution (as proposed by IDSA guidelines):

  1. A multiple step algorithm:
  • GDH assay + EIA assay
  • GDH assay + EIA assay with NAAT as a tiebreaker
  • NAAT + EIA assay

                  OR

  1. We can agree to be more mindful of when we send the test (when the pre-test probability is high) and continue to use the NAAT/PCR method alone.

Bottom line: Many hospitals are switching over to the two-step testing method for multiple reasons:

  • behavior change is difficult to implement and sustain
  • provides more accurate incidence of nosocomial-acquired infections in the hospital

WHEN YOU THINK OF SENDING A C. DIFFICILE TEST, ask yourself:

  1. Does this patient have an unexplained fever, leukocytosis, or new abdominal pain/distention, in addition to the diarrhea (or in presence of ileus)?
    if yes ⇒ send the test
  1. If not, is there another explanation for the diarrhea?
    (i.e. laxatives, new medications (especially antibiotics), part of already known illness, etc.)
    if yes ⇒ consider removing the potential cause (if possible) and re-evaluate or monitor for worsening symptoms
    if not ⇒ send the test

 

Treatment

The IDSA has a really great table to reference when choosing treatment options for your C. difficile infected patient.

***PO Metronidazole is no longer the 1st-line agent for C. diff infection treatment***

C.diff treatment chart

                                                                                                            McDonald et al. CID 2018

 

Recurrence

Recurrence of C. difficile infection = reappearance of symptoms within 2-8 weeks after completion of therapy

  • up to 25% of patients will experience a recurrence
  • once patient had one recurrence, they are at higher risk for future recurrences

 

TAKE-HOME POINTS:

  • The MAJOR risk factor for C. difficile infection is ANTIBIOTIC EXPOSURE
    ⇒ DO NOT give antibiotics to those who do not truly need them
  • Symptoms/signs include watery diarrhea, abdominal cramping/pain, and elevated WBC and creatinine
  • C. difficile infection CAN cause ileus (i.e. no diarrhea)
  • Only send test when you have a high pre-test probability to avoid false positives
  • Metronidazole is NO LONGER recommended for treatment of C. difficile

 

Got questions? Disagree? Leave your comments below!

 

References

  1. McDonald LC, Gerding DN, Johnson S, et al. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Clostridium difficile Infection in Adults and Children: 2017 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). Clin Infect Dis. 2018. 66(7):1-48. [PMID: 29562266]
  2. Jorgensen JH, Pfaller MA, Carroll KC, et al. Manual of Clinical Microbiology, Eleventh Edition.
  3. Lamont JT. (2018). Clostridium difficile infection in adults: Epidemiology, microbiology, and pathophysiology. In Baron EL, ed. UpToDate. Waltham, Mass.: UpToDate, 2018. [https://www.uptodate.com/contents/clostridium-difficile-infection-in-adults-epidemiology-microbiology-and-pathophysiology]. Accessed May 25, 2018.
  4. Lamont JT, Kelly CP, and Bakken JS. Clostridium difficile infection in adults: Clinical manifestations and diagnosis. In Baron EL, ed. UpToDate. Waltham, Mass.: UpToDate, 2018. [https://www.uptodate.com/contents/clostridium-difficile-infection-in-adults-clinical-manifestations-and-diagnosis]. Accessed May 25, 2018.
  5. Kelly CP, Lamont JT, and Bakken JS. Clostridium difficile infection in adults: Treatment and prevention. In Baron EL, ed. UpToDate. Waltham, Mass.: UpToDate, 2018. [https://www.uptodate.com/contents/clostridium-difficile-infection-in-adults-treatment-and-prevention]. Accessed May 25, 2018.